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Dual Diagnosis Studies Performed by Yale, Harvard, and Stanford University

Mental health disorders and addiction often co-occur, and this condition is commonly referred to as dual diagnosis or co-occurring disorders. The treatment of these disorders has been a challenge for mental health professionals, as each disorder can exacerbate the other, leading to a cycle of relapse and remission. Yale University, Harvard University, and Stanford University have conducted research to find the most effective treatment for dual diagnosis patients. In this article, we will discuss the findings of these studies and their implications for the treatment of dual diagnosis patients.
Yale University
Yale University Research

Sadly, many programs do not intermingle mental health services with treatment for substance use disorders. As a result, the individual may be required to seek two separate treatment methods: one for the mental health condition, and a second to address the substance use disorder. This complication can make appropriate diagnosis difficult to detect and treat effectively, reducing favorable outcomes.

To help solve this problem, Renewal Lodge has developed a program that treats mental health and addiction concurrently in the same treatment episode.

Yale
Harvard University Research

Harvard University conducted research on the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in the treatment of dual diagnosis patients. The study found that CBT is an effective treatment for dual diagnosis patients. CBT helps patients identify negative thoughts and behaviors and replace them with positive ones. The study found that CBT reduced substance use and improved mental health symptoms in dual diagnosis patients. The study concluded that “CBT is an effective treatment for dual diagnosis patients and should be included in the treatment plan” (National Institute on Drug Abuse).

Stanford
Stanford University Research

Stanford University conducted research on the use of medication-assisted treatment (MAT) in the treatment of dual diagnosis patients. MAT involves the use of medication to reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms in addiction treatment. The study found that MAT is an effective treatment for dual diagnosis patients. MAT reduced substance use and improved mental health symptoms in dual diagnosis patients. The study concluded that “MAT should be considered as a treatment option for dual diagnosis patients” (National Institute on Drug Abuse).

stanford

Implications for Treatment

The findings of these studies have significant implications for the treatment of dual diagnosis patients. Integrated treatment, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and medication-assisted treatment are all effective treatments for dual diagnosis patients. Mental health and addiction treatment should be provided together in an integrated treatment program. CBT should be included in the treatment plan to help patients replace negative thoughts and behaviors with positive ones. MAT should be considered as a treatment option to reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms in addiction treatment.

In conclusion, the treatment of dual diagnosis patients is a challenge for mental health professionals. However, the research conducted by Yale University, Harvard University, and Stanford University provides valuable insights into the most effective treatments for dual diagnosis patients. Integrated treatment, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and medication-assisted treatment are all effective treatments for dual diagnosis patients. Mental health and addiction treatment should be provided together in an integrated setting like Renewal Lodge in Austin, TX

Dear Renewal Lodge Visitors,

My name is John Bruna, co-founder of the Mindfulness in Recovery® Institute, and more importantly, a grateful member of the recovery community. I am incredibly fortunate to have found my recovery in 1984. Of course, I did not achieve continuous recovery through willpower or my own efforts, but through the guidance and caring support of countless others that selflessly taught me how to live through the 12 Steps.

My journey of recovery brought this once homeless, shame-based, traumatized, insecure young man to a life far beyond anything I could have ever imagined. I discovered self-worth, the joy of helping others, the gifts of parenting and grandparenting, and most importantly the ability to live a meaningful and purposeful life with integrity.

One of the greatest gifts of recovery is that I have the opportunity to give back and help others discover their self-worth, dignity, and the skills to fully live lives that they find truly meaningful. This is the inspiration for developing the skills of Mindfulness in Recovery® (MIR) to meet the needs of new generations struggling with alcohol and other substance use disorders. MIR is a set of evidence-based skills designed to help people fully integrate their tools of recovery in ways that are personalized, practical, and in alignment with their deepest values.

While we train counselors and therapists throughout the United States and abroad, I personally have chosen to work directly with the amazing team and clients at Renewal Lodge to develop the model MIR 12-step program for the nation. I choose Renewal Lodge because of the vision of its mission and the dedication of its team. Renewal Lodge is an extremely rare environment in which the staff embodies the very mindfulness and 12-step practices and skills they offer their clients. The results have been beyond my expectations. It is an honor to be here and I treasure my personal time with every client I meet.

With Gratitude,

John Bruna
John_Bruna_Sig
John Bruna
Director of Mindfulness